A discussion on human function in ethics by aristotle

Here he discussed the conditions under which moral responsibility may be ascribed to individual agents, the nature of the virtues and vices involved in moral evaluation, and the methods of achieving happiness in human life. Every activity has a final cause, the good at which it aims, and Aristotle argued that since there cannot be an infinite regress of merely extrinsic goods, there must be a highest good at which all human activity ultimately aims.

A discussion on human function in ethics by aristotle

This claim is meant to express a basic metaphysical idea, namely, that if something exists, then it necessarily has some degree of goodness. We can divide existing things into two categories: If something is incorruptible, then by definition it cannot be made worse; that is, it cannot lose whatever goodness it may have.

Otherwise, it would not have any goodness it could lose. While this argument may be sufficient to show that corruptible things necessarily have goodness, Augustine uses it to identify a problem with the view that something can exist even if it has no goodness at all.

For if something has no goodness, then it cannot lose goodness and must therefore be incorruptible. And since incorruptibility is better than corruptibility, it looks as if something lacking goodness is better than its corruptible counterpart, which has goodness.

A discussion on human function in ethics by aristotle

Clearly, this is incoherent. Yet this is precisely the implication of claiming that something with no goodness whatsoever can exist.

According to Augustine, the only remedy for this problem is to deny the existence of things that have no goodness. If something exists, then it must necessarily have goodness.

Book 1, Chapter 1

Thus what Aquinas means to convey is that something is good insofar as it actual. By contrast, evil has no actuality in its own right. For him, something is evil insofar as its existence is diminished or corrupted in some way. If something had no goodness whatsoever, it would lack all goods, even the good of existence itself.

A discussion on human function in ethics by aristotle

Following Aristotle, Aquinas says that living things are composites of matter and substantial form. Aquinas goes on to argue that all substances seek their own perfection ST Ia 6. That is, they all seek as their final end a fully realized state of existence or actuality. Yet a substance cannot achieve that final end without exercising the powers it has in virtue of its substantial form.

As Scott MacDonald explains: In other words, a substance achieves its perfection through the proper exercise of its species-defining powers.

Book 1, Chapter 2

Aquinas considers a fairly straightforward objection to this view: But being cannot be more or less. In other words, goodness is a relative property.

Normative Ethics (or Prescriptive Ethics) is the branch of ethics concerned with establishing how things should or ought to be, how to value them, which things are good or bad, and which actions are right or metin2sell.com attempts to develop a set of rules governing human conduct, or a set of norms for action.. Normative ethical theories are usually split into three main categories. Aristotle (— B.C.E.) Aristotle is a towering figure in ancient Greek philosophy, making contributions to logic, metaphysics, mathematics, physics, biology, botany, ethics, politics, agriculture, medicine, dance and metin2sell.com was a student of Plato who in turn studied under Socrates. He was more empirically-minded than Plato or Socrates and is famous for rejecting Plato's theory of forms. Book 1, Chapter 3. Our discussion will be adequate if it has as much clearness as the subject-matter admits of, for precision is not to be sought for alike in all discussions, any .

Some people are morally better than other people. Some horses are more developed and better trained than other horses. Some organs are healthier and function better than other organs.

In each case, the goodness things have will not be identical in terms of quantity. On the other hand, being understood in terms of being actual or existing is not varied in this way. This crucial difference seems to prove that being and goodness cannot be the same.Normative Ethics (or Prescriptive Ethics) is the branch of ethics concerned with establishing how things should or ought to be, how to value them, which things are good or bad, and which actions are right or metin2sell.com attempts to develop a set of rules governing human conduct, or a set of norms for action..

Normative ethical theories are usually split into three main categories. Aristotle, son of a physician, was born in Stagira and sent as a teenager to seek an education in Athens. There he studied under Plato, and, after twenty years at the school of Academe, by way of a spell as tutor to the future Alexander the Great, he returned to Athens to found his own school of philosophy at the Lyceum, whose colonnades, the 'peripatos' gave Aristotle's followers their name.

Aristotle shortly dismissed the possibility that the function of human life which brings eudaimonia is to be found in either “the life of nutrition and growth” or “some sort of life of sense perception” (EN Ia). The fact that Aristotle associates contemplation with a Godlike life also creates problems for viewing this as the fulfillment of a specifically human function.

It is also difficult that in the Politics, Aristotle says that man is by nature a political animal. Aristotle devotes Book V of the Nicomachean Ethics to justice (this is also Book IV of the Eudemian Ethics). In this discussion, Aristotle defines justice as having two different but related senses—general justice and particular justice.

Aristotle conceives of ethical theory as a field distinct from the theoretical sciences. Its methodology must match its subject matter—good action—and must respect the fact that in this field many generalizations hold only for the most part.

Ethics - By Branch / Doctrine - The Basics of Philosophy